Rhode Island: Dept. of Health approves medical marijuana for autism

Great news! The Department of of Health has announced that Rhode Island families can now access medical marijuana to treat autism. The decision was issued this week after a petition was filed in April to add autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to the list of qualifying conditions for medical marijuana.

The announcement imposes some stipulations for physicians interested in recommending medical marijuana for patients with ASD, including that they first try FDA-approved medications and CBD products. The statement can be read in full here.

The Health Department held a public hearing on ASD and medical marijuana in August. At the hearing, Nicole Cervantes, a mother of a son with ASD, testified that CBD had significantly improved her child’s condition. “He has been able to focus more,” she said. “He no longer bangs his head.”

In recent years, families across the country have spoken out about how medical marijuana has helped minimize the worst symptoms of ASD. Rhode Island now joins seven other states that make some allowance for medical marijuana in the treatment of autism.

This is a great step forward for Rhode Island’s medical marijuana program. Let’s keep working to make further improvements to the state’s marijuana policies.

The post Rhode Island: Dept. of Health approves medical marijuana for autism appeared first on MPP Blog.

from https://blog.mpp.org/medical-marijuana/rhode-island-dept-of-health-approves-medical-marijuana-for-autism/…

The fight for Measure 3 is heating up in North Dakota

With less than three weeks until Election Day, efforts to pass Measure 3, which would legalize marijuana for adults in North Dakota, are ramping up. While opponents rely on the standard prohibitionist fear tactics, the Yes on 3 team is sharing a positive message of personal freedom and criminal justice reform with their neighbors across the state.

Please contribute here to help them reach and educate more voters. And if you live in North Dakota, commit to voting for Measure 3 and encourage friends, colleagues, and neighbors to do the same.

In a sign of growing support, state Republican legislative leaders Rep. Rick Becker and Rep. Luke Simons recently made public statements in favor of the legalization initiative. Legendary travel host and anti-prohibition activist Rick Steves also visited the state to tout the benefits of legalizing marijuana, which he’s seen in his home state of Washington.

Thanks to the tireless efforts of volunteer advocates, North Dakota could become the next state to legalize marijuana for adults.

Please donate to the campaign and give the Yes on 3 team the help they need to fight back against their opponents’ anti-marijuana propaganda. And follow the campaign by liking their Facebook page.

With our help, they can win this.

The post The fight for Measure 3 is heating up in North Dakota appeared first on MPP Blog.

from https://blog.mpp.org/tax-and-regulate/the-fight-for-measure-3-is-heating-up-in-north-dakota/…

Study Finds Consumers of CBD-Rich Cannabis Extracts “Generally Tested Negative for THC in Hair”

According to a new study being published in the journal Forensic Science International, and epublished ahead of print by the National Institute of Health, even after repeated consumption of CBD-rich cannabis extracts consumers “generally tested negative for THC in hair”.

Consume CBD extracts? You probably won’t fail a hair test, according to a new study,

“Medical cannabis is becoming increasingly popular for many different ailments and improvement of general well-being”, begins the study’s abstract. “Particularly CBD-rich extracts are easily available via online pharmacies, health stores or directly from producers. However, almost all of the extracts contain small amounts of THC. In our study, we investigated THC, CBN and CBD in hair samples from regular CBD rich cannabis users. ”

The goals of the study “were to determine levels of the cannabinoids in hair and to evaluate a possible correlation between regular CBD intake and CBD levels in hair.” All participants consumed cannabis extracts from the same producer, which “contained CBD at different concentrations and small amounts of THC with a CBD/THC concentration ratio of 30”.

The self-declared CBD dosage ranged from 4 to 128mg CBD/day, corresponding to a daily THC intake of 0.1 to 4.3mg. After extraction and derivatization, hair samples were analysed using a validated GC/MS-MS method. “CBD concentrations ranged from 10 to 325pg/mg of hair, but no significant correlation was observed between CBD concentrations and the daily dose”, states the study. “THC was detected in one sample only at a concentration below our cut-off, whereas CBN was not detected.”

Researchers conclude; “In this study, we showed that even after repeated consumption of CBD-rich cannabis extracts in medium to high doses, consumers are generally tested negative for THC in hair.”

The full study can be found by clicking here.

The post Study Finds Consumers of CBD-Rich Cannabis Extracts “Generally Tested Negative for THC in Hair” appeared first on TheJointBlog.

from https://thejointblog.com/study-finds-consumers-of-cbd-rich-cannabis-extracts-generally-tested-negative-for-thc-in-hair/…

First Legal Canadian Cannabis Sales Recorded in Newfoundland

It’s a celebration in Canada today with the official start of legal marijuana sales for recreational use. The first sale took place just after midnight at the Tweed shop in St. John’s, NL. Local resident Ian Power made the initial purchase.

IAN POWER: “It’s been my dream to be the first person to buy the first legal gram of cannabis in Canada, and here I finally am. I’m elated. I’m so excited, I can’t stop smiling.”

Nova Cannabis also opened in Edmonton, AB

The new law, known as the Cannabis Act, allows for possession of up to 30 grams of marijuana by anyone 19 years old or older (it’s 18 in Alberta and Quebec).

Over the past few weeks, Freedom Leaf has posted a number of articles about Canada:

The Vancouver skyline dotted with various red leaves.

The View from Vancouver: Inside Canada’s Legalization Challenge

John Lennon and Yoko Ono with Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau in 1969 (Photo by Peter Bregg/ The Canadian Press)

Canadian Cannabis Prohibition Predated U.S. Ban by 15 Years

Pot stocks are soaring in the

Vermont general election voter guide published

Early voting is already underway for the Vermont general election, which is scheduled for Tuesday, November 6. Before you vote, please check out our legislative voter guide to learn where candidates for state representative and state senator stand on marijuana policy. Then, please read our guide on the candidates for governor and lieutenant governor.

This year, we sent candidates a survey consisting of only one question: “Do you support regulating and taxing the production and sale of cannabis in Vermont for use by adults 21 and older?” Our voter guides include responses from candidates for state representative, state senator, and governor, in addition to public statements and incumbent legislators’ votes on the legalization bill. If a candidate in your district has not responded to the survey, we encourage you to reach out to them directly and ask their position!

For information on where and how to vote in Vermont, click here.

Again, please take time to read our voter guide for state legislative races and our gubernatorial voter guide before you vote in the November 6 general election. Please share the voter guides with your family and friends!

The post Vermont general election voter guide published appeared first on MPP Blog.

from https://blog.mpp.org/general/vermont-general-election-voter-guide-published/…

South Carolina: November 6 is General Election Day!

South Carolina’s general election, set for Tuesday, November 6, is just 21 days away. The governor’s race and every House of Representatives seat is on the ballot. This is a particularly important election as lawmakers are expected to vote on a medical cannabis bill in 2019, and it will likely need the support of the governor. Those in office will have a huge impact on the future of South Carolina’s patients and their treatment options.

Our voter guide is now available online. It includes all House candidates who either co-sponsored the 2018 medical cannabis bill or who responded to our questionnaire on medical cannabis support. It also includes committee votes and the candidates for governor. While James Smith (D) is a strong supporter of allowing medical cannabis, Gov. Henry McMaster (R) said he would not sign a bill unless law enforcement signs off — which they show no inclination of doing.

Voters’ choices this year will have a huge impact on the future of cannabis policy in the state. If you are registered to vote, know where your candidates stand, and be sure to vote!

If you haven’t registered to vote yet, you have until October 17. For more information, including polling places and other key information, check out the state’s elections website here.

 

The post South Carolina: November 6 is General Election Day! appeared first on MPP Blog.

from https://blog.mpp.org/general/south-carolina-november-6-is-general-election-day/…

The Illinois general election is around the corner

The Illinois general election takes place on November 6. It’s fast approaching, and voters this year will have a huge impact on the future of cannabis policy in Illinois. Lawmakers continue to look closely at ending marijuana prohibition and legalizing cannabis for adults 21 and over, and the differences between the two major party candidates for governor couldn’t be bigger on this issue: JB Pritzker (D) has come out in strong support of legalizing and regulating marijuana, while Gov. Bruce Rauner (R) remains opposed.

Take a minute to check out our Illinois Voter Guide and see where the candidates on your ballot stand on cannabis reform. Not all the candidates have a voting history on cannabis bills in the state House or Senate, but for those that do, we’ve summarized the voting record on key cannabis-related bills over the past several years.

If you haven’t registered to vote yet, you have until October 21 to register online. For more information, including where you can cast your ballot and when voting locations will be open, check out the state’s website here.

In nearby Michigan, voters will have an opportunity to legalize marijuana themselves. But in Illinois, there’s no citizen initiative process, so only lawmakers can end the wasteful and cruel policy of prohibition. This year’s elections will likely have a huge impact on the future of cannabis policy in Illinois. Now is the time for voters who support a better path for Illinois to make their voice heard.

 

The post The Illinois general election is around the corner appeared first on MPP Blog.

from https://blog.mpp.org/general/the-illinois-general-election-is-around-the-corner/…

Celebrate Legalization with These Infused Canadian Sweets

These layered bars made their debut in a 1950s cookbook from the Vancouver Island city of Nanaimo. They’ve been growing in popularity ever since. (Photos by Mitch Mandell)

GNARLY NANAIMO BARS 

Crust

  • 2 tbsp. cannabis-infused butter (melted)
  • 2 tbsp. butter (melted)
  • 5 tbsp. unsweetened cocoa
  • 1 egg
  • 2 cups graham cracker crumbs
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 cup flaked coconut (sweetened or unsweetened)
  • 1/2 cup walnuts or pecans, finely chopped

 Filling

  • 1/4 cup instant vanilla pudding mix
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 1 cup butter (softened)
  • 4 cups confectioner’s sugar
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract

Icing

  • 1 1/4 cups chocolate chips
  • 1/3 cup heavy cream

Preheat oven to 350°F. Lightly grease a 9-inch square baking pan. Place all of the crust ingredients in a food processor bowl and pulse until thoroughly combined. Press the mixture in an even layer in the bottom of the prepared pan. Bake for 10 minutes. Let cool completely before proceeding. In a small bowl, stir together the pudding mix and milk. In a large bowl, use an electric mixer and beat the softened butter until light and fluffy. Add vanilla and pudding/milk mixture until smooth. Slowly add confectioner’s sugar until smooth. Use a rubber spatula to smooth the filling over the cooled crust. Chill for at least an hour. Prepare icing by combining the chocolate chips and cream in a small saucepan over medium heat. Stir constantly until chocolate is melted and mixture is smooth. Spread icing over chilled bars. Chill until cold, then cut into squares. Store covered in the refrigerator up to a week or wrap individually and freeze for longer storage. Makes 18 bars.

Classic Butter Tarts date back to the pioneers who settled the Canadian prairies. This maple-enhanced version gives a nod to Canada’s east coast.

BLAZED BUTTER TARTS

Crust

  • 2 1/2 cups flour
  • 2 tbsp. sugar
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 cup cannabis-infused butter (cold)
  • 3/4 cup butter (cold)
  • 1/3 cup ice water

 Filling

  • 1/2

WA Liquor and Cannabis Board Puts Hold on Edibles Ban, Seeks Public Comment

Just a week after announcing a ban on certain marijuana-infused products, the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board says it’s placing a hold on the ban to give marijuana industry groups time to formulate and present alternative rules.

Marijuana gummy bears (photo: PotValet.com).

In addition, the board has opened up a 30 day public comment period seeking input on the proposed ban, which would effect products deemed to be enticing to children, such as marijuana gummy bears.

In announcing the ban, the board said it would require all edibles producers to resubmit their products for review and approval, and in an online presentation, the agency advised that “all production” of hard candies, tarts, fruit chews, jellies, colorful chocolates and gummy-type products should be stopped as they won’t meet the new criteria.

In a letter to the board sent on October 8, three influential industry groups asked the agency to “immediately rescind” the new rules, calling them “arbitrary and sudden.” They noted that “No regulated industry can survive when regulatory activity is unpredictable”.

The post WA Liquor and Cannabis Board Puts Hold on Edibles Ban, Seeks Public Comment appeared first on TheJointBlog.

from https://thejointblog.com/wa-liquor-and-cannabis-board-puts-hold-on-edibles-ban-seeks-public-comment/…

The Epidiolex Effect: Will Other CBD Drugs Receive FDA and DEA Approval?

Though it doesn’t get users high like THC-dominant products, CBD is all the rage these days due to its medical benefits and gray-area legality.

On September 28, the DEA designated Epidiolex—a plant-based CBD pharmaceutical manufactured by the UK-based GW Pharmaceuticals—a Schedule V drug in the government’s list of controlled substances. All other CBD formulations remain in Schedule I, which is for drugs with a “high potential for abuse” and “no currently accepted medical use.” Schedules III to V are for “drugs with lower potential for abuse.”

This move reinforced a federal ruling on April 16 that affirmed the December 2016 DEA decision to create a new Schedule I code for cannabis extracts, including CBD extracts. The FDA’s Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee concluded that Epidiolex was safe, effective and had negligible abuse potential. On the basis of their review, the agency approved Epidiolex for use in treating rare forms of childhood epilepsy (Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome).

A month later, on May 16, the Department of Health and Human Services approved the FDA’s Epidiolex recommendation.

Frontier Data predicts

Canada’s Marijuana Legalization Law Takes Effect on Wednesday

 Marijuana possession and use will officially become legal for those 18+ in Canada on Wednesday, with regulated adult sales set to begin in several provinces around the country.

Canada’s parliament approved Bill C-45, known as the Cannabis Act, in June. It creates an overarching national regulatory framework and enables each province to establish its own system of licensing and regulating marijuana businesses. Adults will be allowed to possess up to 30 grams of marijuana, and all products will be sold in plain packaging with clearly marked labels.

Canada is just the second country and the first G7 nation to legalize marijuana for adults at the national level. The first was Uruguay, where legislation was signed into law in December 2013 and a limited number of pharmacies began selling marijuana to adults in July 2017. Nine U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and one U.S. territory, the Northern Mariana Islands, have enacted laws making marijuana legal for adults 21 and older. Eight of those states and the Northern Marianas have also established systems for regulating commercial cultivation and sales.

“Canada is setting a strong example for how to end marijuana prohibition at the national level and replace it with a system of regulated production and sales that is largely governed at the local level” says Steve Hawkins, executive director of the Marijuana Policy Project. “The U.S. and other countries grappling with the complexities of such a significant policy shift will have an excellent opportunity to learn from the Canadian experience.”

Hawkins continues; “The Canadian model is rather similar to what many envision for the U.S., and in many ways it mirrors what is happening here, as states have taken the lead in regulating commercial cannabis activity. The big difference—and it is a critical difference—is the blessing provincial governments have received from their federal government. It is time for Congress to step up and take similar action to harmonize our nation’s …

Hemp Oil Benefits: They Might Not Be What You Think

Hemp Oil Benefits

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: the cannabis culture is a creative culture. They enjoy few things more than making up slang terms for their beloved wacky weed (which in itself is a slang term). Usually, this isn’t a problem. You can say any of the following and people will know what you mean:

  • I’ve got a date with Mary Jane.
  • I’m going to fire up a fat one.
  • Let’s smoke a doobie.
  • We gettin’ our ganja on.

But sometimes, substituting one word for another is bad form and can communicate the wrong information. Case in point: calling a blunt a joint, or vice versa. There are distinct differences between a blunt and a joint, and trying to use them interchangeably will confuse those who understand the differences.

Another prime example is the confusion wrought by the careless use of the term hemp oil. Hemp oil is often used to refer to CBD oil, cannabis oil, and canna oil (just to name a few). But there is a big difference between hemp oil and the cannabis oil to which most people are referring when they use the term.

The experts at Honest Marijuana are here to set the record straight about hemp and hemp oil benefits. Along the way, we’ll address such issues as:

  • What is hemp oil?
  • How does hemp oil differ from cannabis oil?
  • What are the benefits of using hemp oil?

We’ll conclude by giving you the bottom line about hemp oil, and show you how you can begin to use the term correctly. But before we get to that, we have to start at the beginning and answer the most basic question of all: What is hemp?

What Is Hemp?

Hemp is a non-psychoactive variety of the Cannabis sativa plant. Hemp is non-psychoactive because it contains less than 1% of the cannabinoid tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). THC is the cause

Hemp Oil Benefits: They Might Not Be What You Think

Hemp Oil Benefits

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: the cannabis culture is a creative culture. They enjoy few things more than making up slang terms for their beloved wacky weed (which in itself is a slang term). Usually, this isn’t a problem. You can say any of the following and people will know what you mean:

  • I’ve got a date with Mary Jane.
  • I’m going to fire up a fat one.
  • Let’s smoke a doobie.
  • We gettin’ our ganja on.

But sometimes, substituting one word for another is bad form and can communicate the wrong information. Case in point: calling a blunt a joint, or vice versa. There are distinct differences between a blunt and a joint, and trying to use them interchangeably will confuse those who understand the differences.

Another prime example is the confusion wrought by the careless use of the term hemp oil. Hemp oil is often used to refer to CBD oil, cannabis oil, and canna oil (just to name a few). But there is a big difference between hemp oil and the cannabis oil to which most people are referring when they use the term.

The experts at Honest Marijuana are here to set the record straight about hemp and hemp oil benefits. Along the way, we’ll address such issues as:

  • What is hemp oil?
  • How does hemp oil differ from cannabis oil?
  • What are the benefits of using hemp oil?

We’ll conclude by giving you the bottom line about hemp oil, and show you how you can begin to use the term correctly. But before we get to that, we have to start at the beginning and answer the most basic question of all: What is hemp?

What Is Hemp?

Hemp is a non-psychoactive variety of the Cannabis sativa plant. Hemp is non-psychoactive because it contains less than 1% of the cannabinoid tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). THC is the cause

Congressman Says Trump Plans to Back State Marijuana Laws, Unveil Federal Reforms, Following Midterms

Representative Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA) says that the Trump Administration has made a “solid commitment” to fix federal marijuana laws in order to respect states’ rights after next month’s election.

In an interview with Fox Business on Thursday, Rohrabacher said that he had been talking with people inside the White House about ending marijuana prohibition, and says he’s been “reassured that the president intends on keeping his campaign promise” to protect state marijuana laws from federal interference.

“I would expect after the election we will sit down and we’ll start hammering out something that is specific and real,” he said. “It could be as early as spring of 2019, but definitely in the next legislative session”.

Rohrabacher says that Trump has made a “solid commitment” to do so.

In April President Trump pledged that the federal government won’t interfere with state laws that legalize marijuana, and said he’ll support legislative efforts to cement this.

The post Congressman Says Trump Plans to Back State Marijuana Laws, Unveil Federal Reforms, Following Midterms appeared first on TheJointBlog.

from https://thejointblog.com/congressman-says-trump-plans-to-back-state-marijuana-laws-unveil-federal-reforms-following-midterms/…

Oct. 17: You’re invited to a special event for Michigan’s YES on 1 campaign!

Proposal 1, the Michigan legalization ballot initiative, is up in the polls, but it’s still too close for comfort. The opposition campaign is just a couple of big checks away from being able to launch a large misinformation campaign.

We’re in the final weeks of the election, and we need to make sure the Yes on 1 campaign has the resources it needs to educate voters about the benefits of legalizing marijuana. Next week, I hope you’ll join me in Ann Arbor for a special evening to support this important campaign.

RSVP via phone (517-974-2265) or email (robin@regulatemi.org). If you can’t attend, please consider making a contribution directly to the campaign here. And please share the word with other supporters. Let’s win this!

The post Oct. 17: You’re invited to a special event for Michigan’s YES on 1 campaign! appeared first on MPP Blog.

from https://blog.mpp.org/tax-and-regulate/oct-17-youre-invited-to-a-special-event-for-michigans-yes-on-1-campaign/…

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy Says State May Legalize Marijuana by the End of the Month

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy (D) says state lawmakers may vote on marijuana legalization on October 29.

Governor Phil Murphy“We’ve had good exchanges with both the legislative leadership sponsors and, most importantly, the teams in the trenches crafting this,” Murphy said during a recent live Facebook interview in which he was asked about legalizing marijuana . “I think it’s sooner than later.”

Murphy says that based on current discussions and support, having a vote on October 29 “feels about right.” The two things that may potentially delay a vote is a debate on marijuana taxes (Senate President Stephen Sweeney says he won’t support anything higher than 12%, while some have argued for as high as 25%), and disagreement about which regulatory body should oversee the legal marijuana industry.

During his election campaign last year Governor Murphy vowed to legalize marijuana within 100 days of becoming governor.  He’s already missed that goal, but has continued to actively push for legalization.

According to polling released in March; “Voters support 59 – 37 percent allowing adults to legally possess small amounts of marijuana for personal use”. Support is “63 – 33 percent among men and 55 – 41 percent among women. White voters support legalized marijuana 58 – 39 percent, with non-white support at 60 – 35 percent. ”

Last month New Jersey’s Senate Economic Growth Committee passed a bill that would legalize industrial hemp. However, the measure would have had no impact on marijuana laws.

Under current New Jersey law, possessing under 50 grams of marijuana is punishable by an $1,000 fine and up to six months in jail.

The post New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy Says State May Legalize Marijuana by the End of the Month appeared first on TheJointBlog.

from https://thejointblog.com/new-jersey-governor-phil-murphy-says-state-may-legalize-marijuana-by-the-end-of-the-month/…

Trump Administration Seeking Public Comment on the Potential Rescheduling of Marijuana

The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is currently seeking public comment regarding the potential rescheduling of marijuana and 16 other substances.

“The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requesting interested persons to submit comments concerning abuse potential, actual abuse, medical usefulness, trafficking, and impact of scheduling changes on availability for medical use of” cannabis and 16 other substances, says Leslie Kux, FDA’s Associate Commissioner for Policy, in a Federal Register posting.

“These comments will be considered in preparing a response from the United States to the World Health Organization (WHO) regarding the abuse liability and diversion of these drugs. WHO will use this information to consider whether to recommend that certain international restrictions be placed on these drugs.”

The WHO’s Expert Committee on Drug Dependence (ECDD) is meeting next month to consider the classification of not just marijuana, but a list of other substances.

Kux notes that “This notice requesting comments is required by the Controlled Substances Act (the CSA).”

According to the Federal Register posting:

“You may submit comments as follows. Please note that late, untimely filed comments will not be considered. Electronic comments must be submitted on or before (enter date), 2018. The https://www.regulations.gov electronic filing system will accept comments until 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time at the end of October 31, 2018. Comments received by mail/hand delivery/courier (for written/paper submissions) will be considered timely if they are postmarked or the delivery service acceptance receipt is on or before that date.

Electronic Submissions

Submit electronic comments in the following way:

  • Federal eRulemaking Portal: https://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments. Comments submitted electronically, including attachments, to https://www.regulations.gov will be posted to the docket unchanged. Because your comment will be made public, you are solely responsible for ensuring that your comment does not include any confidential information that you or a third party may not wish to be posted, such as

Pennsylvania Committee Passes Marijuana Decriminalization Bill

Legislation that would decriminalize an individual’s first two instances of personal marijuana possession has been passed by a key House committee in Pennsylvania.

House Bill 928 would reduce the penalty for possessing marijuana for the first and second  time from a misdemeanor to a fine of $300 with no possibility of jail time (given the possession was for personal use). If someone is caught possessing marijuana for a third time, they could still face a misdemeanor charge.

The measure, filed by State Representative Barry Jozwiak (R) with 30 bipartisan cosponsors, was passed Tuesday by the House Judiciary Committee by a vote of 14 to 9. The legislation now moves towards a vote by the full House of Representatives, where passage would send it to the Senate.

The full text of House Bill 928 can be found by clicking here.

The post Pennsylvania Committee Passes Marijuana Decriminalization Bill appeared first on TheJointBlog.

from https://thejointblog.com/pennsylvania-committee-passes-marijuana-decriminalization-bill/…

Vermont’s Addison County will host two expungement events in October

State’s attorney’s office and legal experts will assist Vermonters with clearing misdemeanor marijuana conviction records on October 12 and 28.

Now that Vermont’s marijuana legalization law has taken effect, the state’s attorney (prosecutor) for Addison County has announced that two expungement clinics will be held to assist Vermonters with having their records cleared of misdemeanor marijuana offenses. Volunteers will assist people who have been convicted of marijuana possession in Addison County with filling out expungement petitions on Friday, October 12 and Sunday, October 28.

WHAT: Addison County Expungement Clinic
WHERE: Probate Court Room, Addison County Court House, 7 Mahady Ct., Middlebury
WHEN: Friday, October 12, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.

WHAT: Addison County Expungement Clinic
WHERE: Middlebury College Kirk Alumni Center, 217 Golf Course Rd., Middlebury
WHEN: Sunday, October 28, 2:00 to 4:30 p.m.

A fee may be required. Financial assistance may be available. Click here for more details on the process.

If you have been convicted of misdemeanor marijuana possession in another Vermont county, you may wish to call and ask what it would take to have your record expunged. You can find phone numbers for all of Vermont’s state’s attorneys’ offices here.

We are very grateful to the Addison County State’s Attorney’s Office, Vermont Legal Aid, the Center for Justice Reform at Vermont Law School, and the Pennywise Foundation for sponsoring these clinics. Thanks also to drug policy reform advocate Dave Silberman for working to make this happen.

Please share this news with your family and friends!

The post Vermont’s Addison County will host two expungement events in October appeared first on MPP Blog.

from https://blog.mpp.org/uncategorized/vermonts-addison-county-will-host-two-expungement-events-in-october/…

The View from Vancouver: Inside Canada’s Legalization Challenge

On October 17, regulated cannabis sales will begin in the Great White North. But some industry veterans there are questioning whether Canada is doing it the right way.

Vansterdam—that sobriquet for Canada’s most liberal city is well-earned. When marijuana legalization was just a glimmer in the eyes of cannabis activists, there was Vansterdam, a sly reference to Holland’s Amsterdam, which launched the retail movement with their coffeeshops filled with smokeable flower and brilliant hash in the 1980s. That trend eventually found a home in Vancouver. Today, dotted across the city’s landscape, are stores where you can toke onsite and/or purchase various take-home products, from buds to concentrates.

I’m in the Cannabis Culture shop at 1674 Davie St., located on a quiet block away from commercial traffic, about a half mile from Stanley Park. It’s not high noon yet. I’m en route to the park for a hike (it’s six miles around the park’s sea wall). I settle down at a seat at the dab bar, where six coiled rigs are spaced apart.

The menu on the board behind the bar is colorful, with illustrations for each strain, from Blue Mango to Skywalker OG. I ask for the former and the THC Distillate, which I’ve never tried. Whereas I cough when inhaling the Blue Mango, the distillate (strictly THC) goes down real smooth. In addition, I purchase an Orange Tangie pre-roll. The bill is C$20 ($15 US). Pleasantly stoned, I head to the park and commence my hike.

Pennsylvania committee approves partial decrim bill

Although 59% of Pennsylvania voters think it should be legal for adults to use marijuana, state law lags far behind popular sentiment. Pennsylvanians found with cannabis can still be locked in a jail cell and branded criminals.

But that could change soon. Yesterday, the House Judiciary Committee approved a decriminalization bill, H.B. 928. Unfortunately, however, it first amended the bill to exclude minors and people in vehicles from decriminalization.

If you live in Pennsylvania, ask your state representative to support and fix the decriminalization bill.

Currently, simple possession is a misdemeanor carrying up to 30 days in jail and/or a fine of up to $500, plus a six-month or one-year driver’s license suspension.

Except in the case of minors, possession in cars, or possession on school property, H.B. 928 would downgrade first and second offense possession of under 30 grams to a summary offense carrying a fine of no more than $300. Subsequent convictions would be misdemeanors carrying up to a $1,000 fine, but with no jail time.

Please take a moment to ask your rep to support H.B. 928, but to work to amend the bill. Let them know: Minors should also not be incarcerated for cannabis, and criminalizing possession in cars will still senselessly ruin lives.

Then, spread the word to others, so that they, too, can raise their voices.

The post Pennsylvania committee approves partial decrim bill appeared first on MPP Blog.

from https://blog.mpp.org/uncategorized/pennsylvania-committee-approves-partial-decrim-bill/…

Gravity Bong: How To Make Your Own

scenic view of waterfall over green mountains

We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again: Marijuana smokers are some of the most creative people on the planet when it comes to devising ways to get their fix. People build bongs out of snow, fruit, mannequin heads, and old video game controllers. What other culture goes to such great lengths to add some spice to their smoking? Certainly not the tobacco smokers who’ve stuck stoically to the cigarette and the pipe since…well, forever. How boring.

Gravity bong cannabis

Source: MedicalNewsToday.com

If you’re looking for a novel way to get your ganja on, why not try the gravity bong. Sure you’ve smoked a joint, toked on a bong, and took a drag from a blunt, but have you ever let gravity do most of the work? Of course not.

But what exactly are the different types of gravity bongs? How do they work? And should you make your own or buy a professionally-produced model? This article will answer those questions.

How To Make Your Own Bucket Gravity Bong

There are actually two different types of gravity bongs: the bucket bong and the waterfall bong (hence the picture of the waterfall at the beginning of this article). The bucket bong is perhaps the most well-known of the gravity bongs. It can be built in various sizes depending on the size of your chamber and the size of your water container. We’ll describe the most common build and you can scale it up or down as necessary.

Here’s what you’ll need to get started:

  1. An empty two-liter pop bottle
  2. A cap for that two-liter pop bottle
  3. A bucket
  4. Water
  5. A drill
  6. A bud bowl
  7. A lighter
  8. Your favorite ganja

First, fill the bucket with water until it’s about an inch from the top. Next, drill a hole through the pop bottle cap. You’re going to insert the stem of your bowl through this hole and you want it to be as

Is Marijuana Legal in Maine

Is marijuana legal in Maine?

is marijuana legal in maine

Maine is one of nine states that have legalized marijuana. Here’s some more details.

Maine voters legalized marijuana

In 2016 Maine voters passed Question 1, legalizing marijuana for everyone 21 and older. 50.26% voted in favor.

Portions of the law took effect on January 30, 2017, allowing for the possession of up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana.

Is growing marijuana legal in  Maine?

It is legal in Maine for anyone 21+ to grow marijuana for personal use. They may grow up to six plants at a private residence. As with the provision of the initiative allowing marijuana possession, this took effect on January 30, 2017.

Are marijuana stores legal in Maine?

Question 1 authorizes marijuana retail outlets. However, the state’s legal marijuana system isn’t expected to be up and running until spring or summer of next year. Once up and running, the state will have a system of licensed and regulated marijuana retail outlets.

Is marijuana legal for minors in Maine?

Question 1 legalized marijuana for everyone 21 and older. However, it did not legalize marijuana for those under 21. Possessing, growing or buying marijuana remains illegal for minors as well as those 18 to 20. The penalties remain the same as they were prior to Prop 1’s passage.

Is it legal to smoke marijuana in public in Maine?

Smoking marijuana in public remains illegal in Maine. Those caught smoking marijuana in public as well as holding marijuana in the open, can be given a civil infraction (ticket). The ticket is a maximum of $100.

What other states have legalized marijuana?

Eight other states besides Maine have legalized marijuana for all uses. These are:

  • Colorado
  • Washington
  • Alaska
  • Oregon
  • California
  • Massachusetts
  • Nevada
  • Vermont

 

Of these states,  including Maine, only Vermont legalized marijuana through the legislature. They are  also the only state to not allow marijuana stores.

Washington is the only state that doesn’t allow …

Major compromise reached in Utah

On October 4 in Salt Lake City, medical marijuana supporters and opponents announced that they have reached an agreement on a compromise medical marijuana law that will be enacted during a November special session after the 2018 election.

Regardless of the outcome of Prop 2 — the medical marijuana ballot initiative that MPP helped to draft — the legislature will enact the compromise bill. Utah Governor Gary Herbert has committed to calling the special session.

MPP strongly supports the agreement because it will ensure that a workable medical marijuana law is enacted and implemented. In Utah, a statutory ballot initiative can be amended or even repealed by a simple majority in the legislature. If Prop 2 passed without any agreement on next steps, patients may have been left waiting years to access legal medical cannabis. This compromise eliminates that uncertainty and ensures legislative leaders are committed to making the law work.

This agreement has the support of the Utah Patients Coalition (the Prop 2 campaign committee), Utah Governor Gary Herbert, the Speaker of the Utah House of Representatives, the Utah Senate President, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and the Utah Medical Association.

The compromise bill, while not ideal and cumbersome in certain respects, is workable and provides a path for Utah patients to legally access medical cannabis, including whole-plant products. MPP staff were consulted during the negotiations and provided critical input on the final agreement.

MPP has been assisting the campaign since its inception in early 2017. We helped draft the initiative, and we made significant financial contributions to fund the successful signature drive (and its subsequent legal defense). While we still wish to see Prop 2 pass, both sides have agreed to de-escalate their campaign activities.

MPP would like to thank the many individual donors who supported the Utah Patients Coalition over the last 18 months. Your generosity enabled a successful signature drive. If Prop …