Canada’s Marijuana Legalization Law Takes Effect on Wednesday

 Marijuana possession and use will officially become legal for those 18+ in Canada on Wednesday, with regulated adult sales set to begin in several provinces around the country.

Canada’s parliament approved Bill C-45, known as the Cannabis Act, in June. It creates an overarching national regulatory framework and enables each province to establish its own system of licensing and regulating marijuana businesses. Adults will be allowed to possess up to 30 grams of marijuana, and all products will be sold in plain packaging with clearly marked labels.

Canada is just the second country and the first G7 nation to legalize marijuana for adults at the national level. The first was Uruguay, where legislation was signed into law in December 2013 and a limited number of pharmacies began selling marijuana to adults in July 2017. Nine U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and one U.S. territory, the Northern Mariana Islands, have enacted laws making marijuana legal for adults 21 and older. Eight of those states and the Northern Marianas have also established systems for regulating commercial cultivation and sales.

“Canada is setting a strong example for how to end marijuana prohibition at the national level and replace it with a system of regulated production and sales that is largely governed at the local level” says Steve Hawkins, executive director of the Marijuana Policy Project. “The U.S. and other countries grappling with the complexities of such a significant policy shift will have an excellent opportunity to learn from the Canadian experience.”

Hawkins continues; “The Canadian model is rather similar to what many envision for the U.S., and in many ways it mirrors what is happening here, as states have taken the lead in regulating commercial cannabis activity. The big difference—and it is a critical difference—is the blessing provincial governments have received from their federal government. It is time for Congress to step up and take similar action to harmonize our nation’s …

Hemp Oil Benefits: They Might Not Be What You Think

Hemp Oil Benefits

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: the cannabis culture is a creative culture. They enjoy few things more than making up slang terms for their beloved wacky weed (which in itself is a slang term). Usually, this isn’t a problem. You can say any of the following and people will know what you mean:

  • I’ve got a date with Mary Jane.
  • I’m going to fire up a fat one.
  • Let’s smoke a doobie.
  • We gettin’ our ganja on.

But sometimes, substituting one word for another is bad form and can communicate the wrong information. Case in point: calling a blunt a joint, or vice versa. There are distinct differences between a blunt and a joint, and trying to use them interchangeably will confuse those who understand the differences.

Another prime example is the confusion wrought by the careless use of the term hemp oil. Hemp oil is often used to refer to CBD oil, cannabis oil, and canna oil (just to name a few). But there is a big difference between hemp oil and the cannabis oil to which most people are referring when they use the term.

The experts at Honest Marijuana are here to set the record straight about hemp and hemp oil benefits. Along the way, we’ll address such issues as:

  • What is hemp oil?
  • How does hemp oil differ from cannabis oil?
  • What are the benefits of using hemp oil?

We’ll conclude by giving you the bottom line about hemp oil, and show you how you can begin to use the term correctly. But before we get to that, we have to start at the beginning and answer the most basic question of all: What is hemp?

What Is Hemp?

Hemp is a non-psychoactive variety of the Cannabis sativa plant. Hemp is non-psychoactive because it contains less than 1% of the cannabinoid tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). THC is the cause

Hemp Oil Benefits: They Might Not Be What You Think

Hemp Oil Benefits

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: the cannabis culture is a creative culture. They enjoy few things more than making up slang terms for their beloved wacky weed (which in itself is a slang term). Usually, this isn’t a problem. You can say any of the following and people will know what you mean:

  • I’ve got a date with Mary Jane.
  • I’m going to fire up a fat one.
  • Let’s smoke a doobie.
  • We gettin’ our ganja on.

But sometimes, substituting one word for another is bad form and can communicate the wrong information. Case in point: calling a blunt a joint, or vice versa. There are distinct differences between a blunt and a joint, and trying to use them interchangeably will confuse those who understand the differences.

Another prime example is the confusion wrought by the careless use of the term hemp oil. Hemp oil is often used to refer to CBD oil, cannabis oil, and canna oil (just to name a few). But there is a big difference between hemp oil and the cannabis oil to which most people are referring when they use the term.

The experts at Honest Marijuana are here to set the record straight about hemp and hemp oil benefits. Along the way, we’ll address such issues as:

  • What is hemp oil?
  • How does hemp oil differ from cannabis oil?
  • What are the benefits of using hemp oil?

We’ll conclude by giving you the bottom line about hemp oil, and show you how you can begin to use the term correctly. But before we get to that, we have to start at the beginning and answer the most basic question of all: What is hemp?

What Is Hemp?

Hemp is a non-psychoactive variety of the Cannabis sativa plant. Hemp is non-psychoactive because it contains less than 1% of the cannabinoid tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). THC is the cause

Congressman Says Trump Plans to Back State Marijuana Laws, Unveil Federal Reforms, Following Midterms

Representative Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA) says that the Trump Administration has made a “solid commitment” to fix federal marijuana laws in order to respect states’ rights after next month’s election.

In an interview with Fox Business on Thursday, Rohrabacher said that he had been talking with people inside the White House about ending marijuana prohibition, and says he’s been “reassured that the president intends on keeping his campaign promise” to protect state marijuana laws from federal interference.

“I would expect after the election we will sit down and we’ll start hammering out something that is specific and real,” he said. “It could be as early as spring of 2019, but definitely in the next legislative session”.

Rohrabacher says that Trump has made a “solid commitment” to do so.

In April President Trump pledged that the federal government won’t interfere with state laws that legalize marijuana, and said he’ll support legislative efforts to cement this.

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Oct. 17: You’re invited to a special event for Michigan’s YES on 1 campaign!

Proposal 1, the Michigan legalization ballot initiative, is up in the polls, but it’s still too close for comfort. The opposition campaign is just a couple of big checks away from being able to launch a large misinformation campaign.

We’re in the final weeks of the election, and we need to make sure the Yes on 1 campaign has the resources it needs to educate voters about the benefits of legalizing marijuana. Next week, I hope you’ll join me in Ann Arbor for a special evening to support this important campaign.

RSVP via phone (517-974-2265) or email (robin@regulatemi.org). If you can’t attend, please consider making a contribution directly to the campaign here. And please share the word with other supporters. Let’s win this!

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New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy Says State May Legalize Marijuana by the End of the Month

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy (D) says state lawmakers may vote on marijuana legalization on October 29.

Governor Phil Murphy“We’ve had good exchanges with both the legislative leadership sponsors and, most importantly, the teams in the trenches crafting this,” Murphy said during a recent live Facebook interview in which he was asked about legalizing marijuana . “I think it’s sooner than later.”

Murphy says that based on current discussions and support, having a vote on October 29 “feels about right.” The two things that may potentially delay a vote is a debate on marijuana taxes (Senate President Stephen Sweeney says he won’t support anything higher than 12%, while some have argued for as high as 25%), and disagreement about which regulatory body should oversee the legal marijuana industry.

During his election campaign last year Governor Murphy vowed to legalize marijuana within 100 days of becoming governor.  He’s already missed that goal, but has continued to actively push for legalization.

According to polling released in March; “Voters support 59 – 37 percent allowing adults to legally possess small amounts of marijuana for personal use”. Support is “63 – 33 percent among men and 55 – 41 percent among women. White voters support legalized marijuana 58 – 39 percent, with non-white support at 60 – 35 percent. ”

Last month New Jersey’s Senate Economic Growth Committee passed a bill that would legalize industrial hemp. However, the measure would have had no impact on marijuana laws.

Under current New Jersey law, possessing under 50 grams of marijuana is punishable by an $1,000 fine and up to six months in jail.

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Trump Administration Seeking Public Comment on the Potential Rescheduling of Marijuana

The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is currently seeking public comment regarding the potential rescheduling of marijuana and 16 other substances.

“The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requesting interested persons to submit comments concerning abuse potential, actual abuse, medical usefulness, trafficking, and impact of scheduling changes on availability for medical use of” cannabis and 16 other substances, says Leslie Kux, FDA’s Associate Commissioner for Policy, in a Federal Register posting.

“These comments will be considered in preparing a response from the United States to the World Health Organization (WHO) regarding the abuse liability and diversion of these drugs. WHO will use this information to consider whether to recommend that certain international restrictions be placed on these drugs.”

The WHO’s Expert Committee on Drug Dependence (ECDD) is meeting next month to consider the classification of not just marijuana, but a list of other substances.

Kux notes that “This notice requesting comments is required by the Controlled Substances Act (the CSA).”

According to the Federal Register posting:

“You may submit comments as follows. Please note that late, untimely filed comments will not be considered. Electronic comments must be submitted on or before (enter date), 2018. The https://www.regulations.gov electronic filing system will accept comments until 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time at the end of October 31, 2018. Comments received by mail/hand delivery/courier (for written/paper submissions) will be considered timely if they are postmarked or the delivery service acceptance receipt is on or before that date.

Electronic Submissions

Submit electronic comments in the following way:

  • Federal eRulemaking Portal: https://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments. Comments submitted electronically, including attachments, to https://www.regulations.gov will be posted to the docket unchanged. Because your comment will be made public, you are solely responsible for ensuring that your comment does not include any confidential information that you or a third party may not wish to be posted, such as

Pennsylvania Committee Passes Marijuana Decriminalization Bill

Legislation that would decriminalize an individual’s first two instances of personal marijuana possession has been passed by a key House committee in Pennsylvania.

House Bill 928 would reduce the penalty for possessing marijuana for the first and second  time from a misdemeanor to a fine of $300 with no possibility of jail time (given the possession was for personal use). If someone is caught possessing marijuana for a third time, they could still face a misdemeanor charge.

The measure, filed by State Representative Barry Jozwiak (R) with 30 bipartisan cosponsors, was passed Tuesday by the House Judiciary Committee by a vote of 14 to 9. The legislation now moves towards a vote by the full House of Representatives, where passage would send it to the Senate.

The full text of House Bill 928 can be found by clicking here.

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Vermont’s Addison County will host two expungement events in October

State’s attorney’s office and legal experts will assist Vermonters with clearing misdemeanor marijuana conviction records on October 12 and 28.

Now that Vermont’s marijuana legalization law has taken effect, the state’s attorney (prosecutor) for Addison County has announced that two expungement clinics will be held to assist Vermonters with having their records cleared of misdemeanor marijuana offenses. Volunteers will assist people who have been convicted of marijuana possession in Addison County with filling out expungement petitions on Friday, October 12 and Sunday, October 28.

WHAT: Addison County Expungement Clinic
WHERE: Probate Court Room, Addison County Court House, 7 Mahady Ct., Middlebury
WHEN: Friday, October 12, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.

WHAT: Addison County Expungement Clinic
WHERE: Middlebury College Kirk Alumni Center, 217 Golf Course Rd., Middlebury
WHEN: Sunday, October 28, 2:00 to 4:30 p.m.

A fee may be required. Financial assistance may be available. Click here for more details on the process.

If you have been convicted of misdemeanor marijuana possession in another Vermont county, you may wish to call and ask what it would take to have your record expunged. You can find phone numbers for all of Vermont’s state’s attorneys’ offices here.

We are very grateful to the Addison County State’s Attorney’s Office, Vermont Legal Aid, the Center for Justice Reform at Vermont Law School, and the Pennywise Foundation for sponsoring these clinics. Thanks also to drug policy reform advocate Dave Silberman for working to make this happen.

Please share this news with your family and friends!

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The View from Vancouver: Inside Canada’s Legalization Challenge

On October 17, regulated cannabis sales will begin in the Great White North. But some industry veterans there are questioning whether Canada is doing it the right way.

Vansterdam—that sobriquet for Canada’s most liberal city is well-earned. When marijuana legalization was just a glimmer in the eyes of cannabis activists, there was Vansterdam, a sly reference to Holland’s Amsterdam, which launched the retail movement with their coffeeshops filled with smokeable flower and brilliant hash in the 1980s. That trend eventually found a home in Vancouver. Today, dotted across the city’s landscape, are stores where you can toke onsite and/or purchase various take-home products, from buds to concentrates.

I’m in the Cannabis Culture shop at 1674 Davie St., located on a quiet block away from commercial traffic, about a half mile from Stanley Park. It’s not high noon yet. I’m en route to the park for a hike (it’s six miles around the park’s sea wall). I settle down at a seat at the dab bar, where six coiled rigs are spaced apart.

The menu on the board behind the bar is colorful, with illustrations for each strain, from Blue Mango to Skywalker OG. I ask for the former and the THC Distillate, which I’ve never tried. Whereas I cough when inhaling the Blue Mango, the distillate (strictly THC) goes down real smooth. In addition, I purchase an Orange Tangie pre-roll. The bill is C$20 ($15 US). Pleasantly stoned, I head to the park and commence my hike.

Pennsylvania committee approves partial decrim bill

Although 59% of Pennsylvania voters think it should be legal for adults to use marijuana, state law lags far behind popular sentiment. Pennsylvanians found with cannabis can still be locked in a jail cell and branded criminals.

But that could change soon. Yesterday, the House Judiciary Committee approved a decriminalization bill, H.B. 928. Unfortunately, however, it first amended the bill to exclude minors and people in vehicles from decriminalization.

If you live in Pennsylvania, ask your state representative to support and fix the decriminalization bill.

Currently, simple possession is a misdemeanor carrying up to 30 days in jail and/or a fine of up to $500, plus a six-month or one-year driver’s license suspension.

Except in the case of minors, possession in cars, or possession on school property, H.B. 928 would downgrade first and second offense possession of under 30 grams to a summary offense carrying a fine of no more than $300. Subsequent convictions would be misdemeanors carrying up to a $1,000 fine, but with no jail time.

Please take a moment to ask your rep to support H.B. 928, but to work to amend the bill. Let them know: Minors should also not be incarcerated for cannabis, and criminalizing possession in cars will still senselessly ruin lives.

Then, spread the word to others, so that they, too, can raise their voices.

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Gravity Bong: How To Make Your Own

scenic view of waterfall over green mountains

We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again: Marijuana smokers are some of the most creative people on the planet when it comes to devising ways to get their fix. People build bongs out of snow, fruit, mannequin heads, and old video game controllers. What other culture goes to such great lengths to add some spice to their smoking? Certainly not the tobacco smokers who’ve stuck stoically to the cigarette and the pipe since…well, forever. How boring.

Gravity bong cannabis

Source: MedicalNewsToday.com

If you’re looking for a novel way to get your ganja on, why not try the gravity bong. Sure you’ve smoked a joint, toked on a bong, and took a drag from a blunt, but have you ever let gravity do most of the work? Of course not.

But what exactly are the different types of gravity bongs? How do they work? And should you make your own or buy a professionally-produced model? This article will answer those questions.

How To Make Your Own Bucket Gravity Bong

There are actually two different types of gravity bongs: the bucket bong and the waterfall bong (hence the picture of the waterfall at the beginning of this article). The bucket bong is perhaps the most well-known of the gravity bongs. It can be built in various sizes depending on the size of your chamber and the size of your water container. We’ll describe the most common build and you can scale it up or down as necessary.

Here’s what you’ll need to get started:

  1. An empty two-liter pop bottle
  2. A cap for that two-liter pop bottle
  3. A bucket
  4. Water
  5. A drill
  6. A bud bowl
  7. A lighter
  8. Your favorite ganja

First, fill the bucket with water until it’s about an inch from the top. Next, drill a hole through the pop bottle cap. You’re going to insert the stem of your bowl through this hole and you want it to be as

Is Marijuana Legal in Maine

Is marijuana legal in Maine?

is marijuana legal in maine

Maine is one of nine states that have legalized marijuana. Here’s some more details.

Maine voters legalized marijuana

In 2016 Maine voters passed Question 1, legalizing marijuana for everyone 21 and older. 50.26% voted in favor.

Portions of the law took effect on January 30, 2017, allowing for the possession of up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana.

Is growing marijuana legal in  Maine?

It is legal in Maine for anyone 21+ to grow marijuana for personal use. They may grow up to six plants at a private residence. As with the provision of the initiative allowing marijuana possession, this took effect on January 30, 2017.

Are marijuana stores legal in Maine?

Question 1 authorizes marijuana retail outlets. However, the state’s legal marijuana system isn’t expected to be up and running until spring or summer of next year. Once up and running, the state will have a system of licensed and regulated marijuana retail outlets.

Is marijuana legal for minors in Maine?

Question 1 legalized marijuana for everyone 21 and older. However, it did not legalize marijuana for those under 21. Possessing, growing or buying marijuana remains illegal for minors as well as those 18 to 20. The penalties remain the same as they were prior to Prop 1’s passage.

Is it legal to smoke marijuana in public in Maine?

Smoking marijuana in public remains illegal in Maine. Those caught smoking marijuana in public as well as holding marijuana in the open, can be given a civil infraction (ticket). The ticket is a maximum of $100.

What other states have legalized marijuana?

Eight other states besides Maine have legalized marijuana for all uses. These are:

  • Colorado
  • Washington
  • Alaska
  • Oregon
  • California
  • Massachusetts
  • Nevada
  • Vermont

 

Of these states,  including Maine, only Vermont legalized marijuana through the legislature. They are  also the only state to not allow marijuana stores.

Washington is the only state that doesn’t allow …

Major compromise reached in Utah

On October 4 in Salt Lake City, medical marijuana supporters and opponents announced that they have reached an agreement on a compromise medical marijuana law that will be enacted during a November special session after the 2018 election.

Regardless of the outcome of Prop 2 — the medical marijuana ballot initiative that MPP helped to draft — the legislature will enact the compromise bill. Utah Governor Gary Herbert has committed to calling the special session.

MPP strongly supports the agreement because it will ensure that a workable medical marijuana law is enacted and implemented. In Utah, a statutory ballot initiative can be amended or even repealed by a simple majority in the legislature. If Prop 2 passed without any agreement on next steps, patients may have been left waiting years to access legal medical cannabis. This compromise eliminates that uncertainty and ensures legislative leaders are committed to making the law work.

This agreement has the support of the Utah Patients Coalition (the Prop 2 campaign committee), Utah Governor Gary Herbert, the Speaker of the Utah House of Representatives, the Utah Senate President, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and the Utah Medical Association.

The compromise bill, while not ideal and cumbersome in certain respects, is workable and provides a path for Utah patients to legally access medical cannabis, including whole-plant products. MPP staff were consulted during the negotiations and provided critical input on the final agreement.

MPP has been assisting the campaign since its inception in early 2017. We helped draft the initiative, and we made significant financial contributions to fund the successful signature drive (and its subsequent legal defense). While we still wish to see Prop 2 pass, both sides have agreed to de-escalate their campaign activities.

MPP would like to thank the many individual donors who supported the Utah Patients Coalition over the last 18 months. Your generosity enabled a successful signature drive. If Prop …

Pepsi Looking Into Cannabis Beverages

PepsiCo’s Chief Financial Officer Hugh Johnston has announced that the company is looking into the possibility of developing and releasing cannabis-infused beverages.

“I think we’ll look at it critically”, Johnston told Jim Cramer and Sara Eisen last week on CNBC’s Squawk on the Street, noting that he’s “not prepared to share any plans that we may have in the space right now”.

Johnston’s announcement doesn’t mark the first time a major beverage producer has hinted at making cannabis or CBD-infused drinks, with some actually taking action to do so. For example, earlier this year Constellation, the producers of Corona beer, took an addition $4 billion stake in the Canadian cannabis company Canopy Growth, following up on a previous investment in October.

Last month Coca-Cola said it’s “closely watching the growth of non-psychoactive CBD as an ingredient in functional wellness beverages”.

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National Survey Finds 62% of Americans Support Legalizing Marijuana

Survey results released Monday by the Pew Research Center show a strong majority of American adults support legalizing marijuana.

The national survey of 1,754 U.S. adults found 62% think marijuana should be made legal, while only about one-third of Americans (34%) think it should remain illegal.

“A growing majority of Americans are ready to end the failed policy of marijuana prohibition and move on”,  says Steve Hawkins, executive director of the Marijuana Policy Project. “They see states regulating marijuana for medical and adult use, and they recognize it is a much more effective approach. Laws that treat cannabis consumers like criminals and disproportionately impact communities of color are steadily losing popularity across the U.S.”

Hawkins continues; “Voters are steadily moving in one direction on this issue, and elected officials are taking notice. States are reevaluating their old prohibition laws and starting to plan their exit strategies. It is time for Congress to do the same and end prohibition at the federal level.”

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The 10 Most Popular Ways to Consume Marijuana

By Phillip Smith, StoptheDrugWar.org

The stereotypical picture of marijuana consumption is someone toking up buds in a joint or bong, but as weed comes out from the shadows and into the legal marketplace, entrepreneurs are busily concocting all sorts of pot products.

Consume MarijuanaFrom vape pens to concentrates to edibles, drinks, tinctures, and even creams and topical lotions, marijuana is now available in myriad forms.

But what’s the most popular? Here, we turn to the good folks at BDS Analytics, a company that prides itself on providing “data-driven insights, market intelligence, and complete consumer understanding” of the marijuana industry. BDS has just released its list of the Top 10 ways people are consuming cannabis in 2018, based on results from its proprietary GreenEdge™ Retail Sales Tracking database, which gathered data from California, Colorado, and Oregon from the first half of the year.

The biggest takeaway is that despite all the hoopla about the multitude of new marijuana products, people still overwhelmingly favor inhaling their weed, either as smoke from buds or via vaping. Sales of buds, pre-rolled joints, vape cartridges, and disposable vapes accounted for around $1.8 billion in sales, with another $200 million coming in sales of concentrates, which are typically also inhaled. And it was buds (flowers) that made up more than half of that figure.

Edible and tincture products that made it into the Top 10 only accounted for about $200 million in sales, or about 10 percent of the total pot market in those three states. While edibles and other cannabis concoctions may be the wave of the future, as of now, bud is still the king.

Here are BDS Analytics’ Top 10 pot products, based on total retail sales:

1. Flower: This shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone. We all had joints, bowls and bongs long before we could easily buy weed-infused kombuchas. Good old flower was there first, and it remains on top. Sales: …

Utah Governor to Call Special Session on Medical Marijuana After November Election

Next month voters in Utah will have the opportunity to legalize medical marijuana through a citizen’s initiative, but even if it fails the state’s governor says he plans to hold a special session on the issue.

The Salt Lake Tribune reports that Governor Gary Herbert has pledged to call a special legislative session to take up the issue of medical marijuana following the November general election. He says this is the case whether or not Proposition 2 is passed by voters . If voters reject the initiative, lawmakers will take up a proposal that would would allow qualifying patients to obtain medical marijuana from one of up to five “medical cannabis pharmacies”, or at their county health departments.

“The good news here is that whether [Prop 2] passes or fails, we’re going to arrive at the same point,” says Herbert.

While Proposition 2 would allow patients to purchase marijuana and marijuana products from privately owned dispensaries, the state’s would establish a centralized pharmacy to supply health departments with marijuana in “medicinal dosage form.”

Under the deal announced by Herbert, which was debated by state officials as well as proponents and opponents of Proposition 2, he Department of Health would also issue up to five licenses for privately owned cannabis pharmacies, a number that could increase to 10 if need by.

For more information on Proposition 2, click here.

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The Top 5 Cannabis Smoking Methods

There are many cannabis smoking methods, but these five stand above the rest!

 

  • #5 – Pipes

The pure efficiency and practicality of pipes easily put them above other smoking methods not on this list (knifers, fruit, etc.). However, its simplicity (which is both a blessing and fault), and the fact that hits can be harsher than other methods, hold it back from being higher on the list.

 

  • #4 – Bubblers

Bubblers are the natural evolution of the pipe, and their smoother hits propel them to the fourth position. They may not be as smooth as a bong, but they have a degree  of  portability that many bongs don’t. The main thing holding them back? The options below are  better.

 

  • #3 – Blunts

No other method of smoking is better for extended relaxation sessions alone, or for sharing with large groups of people. The large size allows you to take as large or small of a hit as you want without killing it for the people next in line for a toke. And with the proliferation of blunt wrappers made from hemp, the one negative of some blunts (that the wrap is made from tobacco) is negated.

 

  • #2 – Joints

Joints may not be #1, but they’re not far behind. They’re versatile, fun and perfect for sharing without the necessity of putting forth the large amount of bud required to roll a blunt,. Joints really do stand above the crowd… but slightly below the #1 on this list.

 

  • #1 – Bongs

For some, this will make perfect sense – for others, this will be blasphemy. But when you think about it long and hard, it makes perfect sense. Hitting with a bong is so much smoother than joints or pipes. This allows you to either take a much larger hit, or take a hit that’s roughly the same size but far more enjoyable . If you …

Study: CBD Reduces Cocaine Intake

According to a new study published by the journal Neuropharmacology, cannabidiol (CBD) reduces cocaine intake and has “pro-neurogenic effects” in cocaine consuming animals.

(Photo: Dmitry Tishchenko – Getty Images).

The study, titled Repeated Cannabidiol treatment reduces cocaine intake and modulates neural proliferation and CB1R expression in the mouse hippocampus, was epublished by the National Institute of Health.

“Cannabinoid derivatives have shown promising results for treating neuropsychiatric disorders, including drug addiction”, begins the study’s abstract. “To determine whether CBD can attenuate cocaine reinforcement, we assessed behavioural responses induced by cocaine in mice, using the behavioural sensitization, conditioned place preference and intravenous self-administration paradigms.”

Researchers show that “repeated CBD treatment produces anxiolytic effects in the elevated plus maze test, increases the discrimination index of the novel object recognition task and attenuates cocaine-induced conditioned place preference but does not affect behavioural sensitization.” CBD also “reduced cocaine voluntary consumption and progressive ratio breaking point in the self-administration paradigm, but not drug-induced reinstatement. In parallel, CBD increased expression of type 1 cannabinoid receptor, MAPK-CREB phosphorylation, BDNF expression, and neural cell proliferation in the hippocampus, and reduced the GluA1/2 AMPA subunit receptor ratio in the striatum.”

In summary, researchers state that “CBD can modulate some behavioural and molecular manifestations of cocaine reinforcement. Moreover, our findings show that CBD has pro-neurogenic effects also in cocaine consuming animals. Overall, this novel evidence provides new perspectives to use CBD as a therapeutic tool.”

More information on this study can be found here.

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Trichomes: The Complete Guide

Trichomes

Source: Reddit.com

Are you trying to understand all the convoluted online conversation about cannabis trichomes? What are they? How are they grown? How are they harvested? What’s the best way to consume them?

We gotcha! We’ll help you understand what the trichome buzz in the cannabis community is all about. This post will also help you wrap your mind around the biology of trichomes and their importance to you and to the rest of the cannabis plant.

We’ll make sure you know what you need to about how trichomes are both grown and extracted so you can make well-informed decisions to optimize your cannabis consumption.

We’ll break down the basics of a few traditional trichome consumption methods and also hook you up with a brief intro to dabbing to help you get started dabbling with trichomes!

What Are Trichomes?

Trichomes are totally the grooviest and gooiest part of the cannabis plant. Trichomes are the resin glands of the pot plant that contain THC, CBD, and other active medicinal cannabinoids.

Trichomes are literally the cream of the cannabis crop. Trichomes are the basis of the smokeless revolution in cannabis consumption that has saved the lives of countless medical marijuana users, such as Charlotte Figi.  

Charlotte was cured from suffering over 300 seizures a week induced by Dravet syndrome with a tincture of trichomes from a CBD-rich strain of marijuana now known as Charlotte’s Web, named after the girl’s miraculous recovery.

Extracting trichomes from the cannabis plant also preserves terpenes. Terpenes are the pungent oils that give the cannabis plant its distinct tastes and smells.

Like the sweet, fruity taste of Pineapple Twist? That’s the terpenes. Love the skunky smell of Sour Diesel? That’s the terpenes. In fact, terpenes provide a wide range of tastes and smells including the more common citrus, berry, mint, and pine.

Terpenes also create an entourage of health benefits and help fully

PTSD is the Most Common Condition Treated by Medical Cannabis in Illinois

In Illinois, the number of patients who use medical cannabis for post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) surpasses that of any other condition, according to a new state report.

The report states that PTSD has become the most common medical ailment among patients who are participating in the state’s legal medical cannabis program. The report also found that the program has grown 83% this year to over 46,000 patients.

The number of patients with PTSD who are legal medical cannabis patients doubled in fiscal year 2018, to more than 4,000. This surpassed fibromyalgia (3,400 patients), and cancer (2,500 patients), which were #1 and #2 last year. Rounding out the top five are spinal cord disease and injuries and traumatic brain injuries.

PTSD was added to the state’s medical marijuana program in 2016, joining around 40 other conditions.

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The 53 Best Weed Strains

three forms of marijuana in and around wooden bowl

One of the special joys of cannabis is discovering which specific strains your endocannabinoid system prefers. However, Leafly.com currently has 1,762 strains profiled in their database and it’s not uncommon to come across strains you won’t be able to find listed in their database.

No one even knows how many strains actually exist because cannabis can be endlessly crossbred to create as many different strains of weed as there are stars in the sky. Some strains of weed like Thai Stick, much like certain stars, have already gone extinct while others have yet to exist.

This is why selecting the 53 best weed strains is an undeniably fun task.

marijuana strainsSource: http://www.mmofhi.com/

The first strain of weed was sent to planet Earth from Sirius, according to the Mali people of West Africa who were chronicled by Herodotus around 300 BC.

The word cannabis, or the “two-dog-plant” according to the Mali, is a combination of the words canna, or canine (dog), and bis or bi, signifying the number two because Sirius is the original homeworld of cannabis in the Mali tradition.

Every strain of the mother plant has its own fascinating short story and history.

news graphic showing planet and satelliteSource: Newswatch33.com

Choosing which strains of weed to try from the limitless varieties without contemplating the kinds of pot that could potentially be growing on other planets is enough to make some green cannabis consumers anxious or excited.

It’s even quite common for really serious stoners to get a little depressed when they contemplate how no one will ever be able to smoke every single strain of wonderful weed in the universe.

We cross-referenced data from Leafly, Weedmaps, Hightimes, Complex, and Weed Horn to bring you the ultimate list of our 53 favorite mouth-watering strains of marijuana. We hope that our guide will help make your quest to find your favorite strains of cannabis a little easier.

The 53 Best Weed

Canadian Cannabis Prohibition Predated U.S. Ban by 15 Years

Gerald Le Dain with John Lennon and Yoko Ono in 1969 (Photo by Peter Bregg/The Canadian Press)

Canada’s path to cannabis prohibition closely followed that of its southern neighbor. Like in the United States, a century ago cannabis was widely available in tincture form as a medication before being banned in a campaign that blatantly harnessed racism and xenophobia. Yet now Canada is legalizing coast to coast, starting October 17, while the U.S. federal government refuses to end its 80-year policy.

The Anti-Immigrant Roots of Canadian Prohibition

The Harrison Narcotics Tax Act of 1914, the first major anti-drug legislation in the US, was passed on a wave of anti-Asian hysteria. In Canada, the connection was even more blatant.

On September 7, 1907, a thousands-strong white mob of the Asiatic Exclusion League rampaged through Vancouver’s Chinese and Japanese district trashing shops and throwing some immigrants in the harbor. “Not a Chinese window was missed,” it was reported.

Business owners demanded compensation, and the deputy labor minister—William Lyon Mackenzie King, who later as prime minister led Canada through World War II—was dispatched to investigate. King was shocked to find that the claimants included (legal) opium merchants. Back in Ottawa, he wrote a report on the opium menace, which warned that the Asian drug was catching on with white women and girls.